Creating a High Performance Culture - What It Looks Like

Many managers and business owners mistakenly assume that “high performance” is a synonym for “workaholic.” It might surprise those people to learn that just putting in longer hours does not guarantee that an employee is a top performer. In fact, if the research is to be believed, it may be the employees who work fewer hours who are more productive.

So, if you’re just watching to see who’s still at their desk an hour after quitting time, stop. If you want a high performance culture and workforce, it may be time to change your company culture.

Put Results First

If you’re the boss who stands at the door, handing out frowns and tardy slips to anyone who dares to stroll in one minute after starting time, and who records which employees work the most hours, it’s time to forget that whole attitude.

High performance teams aren’t the ones that reward quantity of time worked. They’re the ones that reward results. After all, squeezing ten extra unproductive hours out of an employee won’t help your bottom line, but rewarding employees who save you money, or increase sales, will. Single out the employees that get the best results, and figure out how they do it.

Give Your Team the Tools They Need

If your team is working harder than ever, but it’s not showing on your balance sheet, then they may not have the right tools for the job. Review how you do everything, and look for tools, software and training that will help your team to do their jobs better, more efficiently and with better results.

Hire Right

There’s an old saying about trying to force a square peg into a round hole, and the same goes for hiring. If you’re trying to force an employee who is not used to being super productive into a high-performance team, you may be fighting a losing battle.

Take a closer look at your talent recruitment strategies. Create profiles of your ideal employees. Take more time on pre-employment checks, and upgrade your employee verification process.

Look beyond college results to employment track records. Has the employee done amazing things elsewhere? Do they have the habit of job hopping? If so, why? Tailor interview questions to find out how candidates would improve your team’s performance, and whether they’re simply putting in time, or a genuine go-getter.

Embrace Change

One of the most common issues for companies these days is often that they’re too set in their ways to change. They’ve been around for so long, and things have always been done a certain way, that they stagnate, and their younger, quicker, more nimble competitors run rings around them.

If you ever catch yourself saying that you’ve always done something that way, then it’s probably time to force change. Hire a top performer from one of those younger competitors. Change how you do things. Investigate new technology. Embrace change, and make continuous improvement a part of your culture.

Competition is tighter in business than it has ever been, and you need to be the very best that you can be to stay relevant and profitable.

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